Susan Wittig Albert’s Boursin

This recipe was in Susan Wittig Albert’s About Thyme newsletter a couple of weeks ago. She writes 2 mystery series (and a 3rd with her husband Bill) which I read and enjoy. Her China Bayles series is set around a herb shop and tea room in the South Texas hill country, so she knows her business about herbs!

I asked her permission to reprint it and she was kind enough to say yes (and respond practically immediately, isn’t she cool?).

Cheese has been an important part of the human diet for at least five thousand years. The smooth texture and unobtrusive taste of milder cheeses make them a perfect companion for savory herbs. Boursin cheese—a mild, creamy cheese flavored with herbs—was originally created in 1957 by François Boursin in the Normandy region of France. Now, the term is used to describe many herb-flavored cheese. You can buy it at the supermarket, or make your own taste-alike.

Boursin
1 cup farmer’s cheese
1 cup Asaigo or Parmesan cheese, grated
8 ounces cream cheese, softened (don’t use “lite” or low-fat)
1 stick butter, softened
1 teaspoon lemon juice
2 tablespoons minced chives
3 cloves garlic, finely minced
½ cup minced parsley
1 teaspoon fresh minced marjoram
1 teaspoon fresh minced thyme

In a large bowl, blend the cheeses. Blend in the butter and lemon juice. Add the other ingredients and mix well. Refrigerate to blend flavors.

Sign up for the About Thyme newsletter here! I’ve been receiving it for years and have NEVER gotten spammed.

Susan’s blog, Lifescapes, about life in the Texas hill country, can be found here.

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